CLMR
Ashley, 19 // college student, cat enthusiast, fake geek girl.
spookgaryened:

triumphdivision:

you are not being a good neIGHBOR

i give up

mr rogers wins

spookgaryened:

triumphdivision:

you are not being a good neIGHBOR

i give up

mr rogers wins

Oct 21 (2) ©
you are not being a good neIGHBOR

you are not being a good neIGHBOR

Oct 21 (2)

spookgaryened what would mr rogers think

Oct 21 (1)

triumphdivision:

spookgaryened:

triumphdivision:

spookgaryened:

now i’m trying to convince my roommate that i KNOW mr. rogers is dead

"he’s not dead, is he?" you asked.

"yes," i said. "he’s dead."

"I KNEW THAT," you replied.

I DEFINITELY KNEW MR. ROGERS WAS DEAD IT WAS FACT CHECKING

look the more you deny it the less i’m convinced

she was only 90% sure ronald regan was dead

Oct 21 (7) ©

spookgaryened:

triumphdivision:

spookgaryened:

now i’m trying to convince my roommate that i KNOW mr. rogers is dead

"he’s not dead, is he?" you asked.

"yes," i said. "he’s dead."

"I KNEW THAT," you replied.

I DEFINITELY KNEW MR. ROGERS WAS DEAD IT WAS FACT CHECKING

look the more you deny it the less i’m convinced

Oct 21 (7) ©

spookgaryened:

now i’m trying to convince my roommate that i KNOW mr. rogers is dead

"he’s not dead, is he?" you asked.

"yes," i said. "he’s dead."

"I KNEW THAT," you replied.

Oct 21 (7) ©

tindr but for study partners

Oct 20 (2)

The ad was in a women’s magazine and if I remember correctly, was for a perfume. It featured a white woman lying in bed with a black man. The man’s shirtless back was to the viewer, making only his taut, muscular form and powerful-looking arms and shoulders visible. He was faceless, unidentified. The woman looked sultrily at us from over his mysterious form, satisfaction writ large over her features. She had partaken of whatever delights this man had to offer and was smugly, luxuriantly basking in the afterglow.

The ad copy was, “Take a walk on the wild side.”

My teacher used the ad as an example of how marketers can use certain words and images to convey large amounts of information subtly and effectively. A white woman having sex with a black man? How risqué. The implication: be a little like that woman. Spray on that perfume and feel like the kind of girl who has sex with faceless, muscular black men in ritzy hotel rooms because it’s an adventure, a thrill, a risk, something illicitly pleasurable.

These are the semiotics of race. This is why columnists will trip over themselves not to call Lupita Nyong’o or Angela Basset “beautiful”, choosing instead to use terms that call to mind a kind of savage, animalistic magnetism: fierce, striking, edgy, eye-catching. Words like “pretty” and “beautiful” and “cute” are for white women whose bodies and sexualities are not seen as wild, animal, or untamed. Black men are hulking, threatening, thuggish; white men are charming, sexy heartthrobs with hearts of gold. Brown women are exotic, with their “honey-coloured” skin and their “mystical”, “enchanting” beauty, unlike their white counterparts, who are held up as not only ideal, but knowable and safe. White people are beautiful; non-white people are dangerous.


by

"The Semiotics of Race, or: Walks on the Wild Side"

by Aaminah Khan (via Black Girl Dangerous)

Oct 20 (18922) ©
paticmak:

I just want Kamala to meet everyone but especially the girls :D

paticmak:

I just want Kamala to meet everyone but especially the girls :D

Oct 20 (316) ©

enjolradz:

friendly reminder that if we’re mutuals and you wanna exchange snapchat names or instagram or something you’re more than welcome (encouraged) to shoot me an ask

Oct 20 (115688) ©

I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)

Oct 20 (9853) ©

delinquentunicorn:

I know I already posted the second one but here they are scanned in a legit way?

Oct 20 (8) ©
art

Pointing out Marvel Studios’ lack of on-screen diversity is nowhere near a new phenomenon. As ComicsAlliance’s Andrew Wheeler has memorably pointed out, “If Marvel makes Thor 3 [as its first 2017 release], it will have made ten movies headlined by blond white men named Chris before it makes one movie headlined by someone who isn’t even white.” While not besmirching the talent or integrity of Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth and Chris Pratt, that’s taking lack of diversity to admirably comic levels.

Additionally, the studio’s lack of a movie with a female lead — specifically, a Black Widow feature starring Scarlett Johansson, although fans would also accept a Captain Marvel movie, or even a Squirrel Girl one by this point — has been commented on to such an extent that Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige recently weighed in, saying that he “very much believe[s] in doing it” in concept. “I hope we do it sooner rather than later,” he added at the time, while simultaneously pointing out that Marvel’s ongoing successful franchises make finding slots for new characters and concepts challenging.

That is somewhat of a smokescreen, in terms of excuses. As this summer’s Guardians of the Galaxy shows, Marvel has no problem introducing new characters and concepts — in fact, we’re due to have one per year for the next couple of years, with Ant-Man coming next year and Doctor Strange landing in 2016. In both of those cases, however, Marvel is sticking closely to white male leads. (Admittedly, the lead role in Doctor Strange is not cast, and it’s not impossible that Marvel will choose to break with tradition and cast a non-white male as its Sorcerer Supreme — but, given some of the actors rumored to have been considered for the role, that doesn’t look likely.)

Of course, there’s still an obvious opportunity for Marvel to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat on the subject of diversity in casting. Both Wonder Woman and Sony’s mystery Spider-Man project are scheduled (in the latter case, rumored) for 2017 release, and Marvel has an unnamed project scheduled for release May 5 of that year — almost two months before the June 23 bow for Wonder Woman. What if it snuck in a female-led movie just under the wire in order to be “first”?

Similarly, Aquaman isn’t due until July 2018, and there are three unknown Marvel projects scheduled before then. Black Panther, Falcon or even an upgrade from Netflix to theaters for Luke Cage could help Marvel become the first studio to put a superhero of color on the big screen since 2008’s Hancock — if it wanted to.

That, ultimately, is what this comes down to: what Marvel wants to do. As arguably the most successful movie studio around these days, and one that has demonstrated no problem in convincing mainstream audiences to accept a dancing tree and a talking raccoon as heroes, it’s not a question of whether Marvel could make a movie with a woman or person of color in the lead role, or even could make such a movie a hit. It’s a question of whether that’s something that the studio is interested in doing. Whenever Marvel announces its next projects — something which may be sooner than later, given this week’s Warner Bros. schedule announcement — we’ll get the answer to that question.


by

The Hollywood Reporter, “Warner Bros. and DC Expose Marvel’s Achilles Heel: Diversity

(via wintersoldier)
Oct 20 (1667) ©